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Granada: Rodin’s “The Thinker”

Granada: Rodin’s “The Thinker”

The University of Granada has nothing on Rodin’s famous penseur, although they’re welcome to try and if not out-think him, then certainly out-drink him through the 27th of this month.  Famous for its university (and the parties that come with the territory of being a school town) and Moorish architecture surrounded by sloping hills and the Andalusian breezes, Granada will host the second leg of the tour of Rodin’s Le Penseur.  More commonly known in English as “The Thinker,” the…

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Bristol: Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery

Bristol: Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery

While it’s rare (let’s face it, a first) for us to profile two cities from the same country on two consecutive days, it’s also rare we remember Valentine’s Day (okay, the flower deliveries to the office probably nudged us into awareness).  And for those of you who can’t get enough of the candy hearts (either the chocolate-filled boxes or the singles that taste like chalk), tear-away cards, and economy-size bags of red vines (this may not be suitable for the…

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Las Palmas: Opera Las Palmas’ Festival de Opera

Las Palmas: Opera Las Palmas’ Festival de Opera

Javier Bardem may be reason enough to visit Las Palmas, but–both fortunately and amazingly–this gem of the Grand Canary Islands (yes, part of Spain) also has an opera festival.  What a delightful combination.  This year’s festival (which begins in March and runs through June) ropes in five of the greatest operas ever written in tribute to Spanish/Austrian tenor Alfredo Kraus who, like Bardem, is a native of LP.  One of the greatest voices of the 20th Century (he gave Domingo…

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Budapest: The Budapest Card

Budapest: The Budapest Card

Available right when you get off the plane (check out their kiosks at Ferihegy Airport), the Budapest Card is either a 8000 Forint ($50 USD) or a 6500 Forint ($40 USD) investment that will last you for 72 or 48 hours. Not only does it give you free transportation on all buses, trams, and metros, it will also get you free entry to most of this Hungarian capital’s museums. While there is great value here in free public transportation (which…

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Scene and Heard: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Scene and Heard: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Ed Note: We’ve been spending the last six months talking about artists, dancers, writers, and musicians realizing that while we know Forsythe and Flaubert and Fille du Regiment and Frida like the back of our hand, we are, in fact, NOT the world (wide web).   So each weekend we’ll plug a new artist (in the general sense) and let you know where you can find them (in the specific sense) and why you should care.  Cool?  Cool. Who He Is:…

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HC/LB Playlist: Southeast Asia is For Lovers

HC/LB Playlist: Southeast Asia is For Lovers

We’ve gone radio silent again for a bit as another big project wraps up. But we do have some more tips and a Scene and Heard that will be posted retroactively later this week. And speaking of Scene and Heard… A comment was posted not once but twice in response to our statement that Mozart is the man behind the tune we associate with “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star.” Since we’re guessing most of you don’t get e-mail notifications of comments…

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Perth: Horsecross Hogmanay

Perth: Horsecross Hogmanay

It’s not exactly what you think of when you hear “high culture,” but the annual celebration of Hogmanay in Scotland is true highlands culture. With roots in sun and fire-worship in the deep mid-winter and the Saturnalia festival of the Romans, the Yule celebrations of the Vikings, and the ensuing Scottish Winter Festivals that were repressed by the church, Hogmanay may appear to be another New Year’s festival, but it is distinctly Scottish and one of the biggest days of…

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Moscow: The Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts

Moscow: The Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts

It’s ironic that the only thing Russian about Moscow’s Pushkin Museum is its name. It’s a further irony that Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin is regarded as one of Russia’s most famous writers–and by far its most famous poet.  It’s perhaps an even further irony that the museum is just a stone’s throw from the Kremlin, one of the most indelible symbols of Russophilia.  Those Russians sure know their…well, do we have to say the “I” word again? When the capital of…

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London: Greenwich+Docklands International Festival

London: Greenwich+Docklands International Festival

Quite possibly one of the greatest parts about London is getting out of London proper and hopping the DLR over to Greenwich.  The St. Christopher’s Inn offers a central hostel location at competitive prices, there is still a sense of olde towne (with the “e”s at the end), and you can experience London’s breadth of culinary treats–from fish and chips, (a much different cuisine than Berlin), with pints to Asian fusion, including a really amazing curry–at slightly lower price-points (and…

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Berlin: Pergamonmuseum

Berlin: Pergamonmuseum

If you’re looking for museums in Berlin, your best starting point is Museumsinsel (Museums Island).  And your best starting point on Museumsinsel is the Pergamonmuseum.  Started in 1910 and completed in 1930, the Pergamonmuseum encompasses the history of Berlin from pre-World War I and the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand, through the mass inflation, Weimar period, and into the first whispers of the Third Reich.  It’s interesting to keep that in mind as you walk under a decidedly un-romantic entry gate…

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